About your Search

20130201
20130228
SHOW
( more )
STATION
FOXNEWSW 193
MSNBCW 173
FOXNEWS 171
MSNBC 166
CNNW 104
CNN 86
CSPAN 86
WRC (NBC) 85
CSPAN2 76
WTTG 65
FBC 59
WUSA (CBS) 59
KNTV (NBC) 51
KPIX (CBS) 50
WJLA (ABC) 45
WBAL (NBC) 44
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1898
Search Results 1,850 to 1,899 of about 1,902 (some duplicates have been removed)
the sequester in a hurry, then yes, it's a real problem because it doesn't let the pentagon begin to plan and distribute, if you will, the cuts. but at the end of the day, whether it's defense spending, education spending, health spending, what always matters more than how much you spend is how you spend it. and so i'm not, at the end of the day, all that worried about how much we spend, whether it's on defense or anything else. you just want to have the time to make some intelligent cuts rather than have to make them literally in a matter of days which would probably mean that readiness more than anything else would be cut out of the defense department account. and that's probably the one thing you don't want cut out of it. >> sam stein, you're close and yet so far away over there at the jump seat. what are the odds that the sequester actually takes place? we know the president's proposed something to push them back a while. are we going to see these kind of cuts, the ones that were outlined in the sequester proposal? >> i think the odds are pretty high, to be honest. i don't think there
to be furloughs at the pentagon, the pay increases for the troops will not be as large as he would like, and then the president today added on to them, said, look, this is going to affect seniors, food safety, the poor. so what they are setting themselves up for is really this argument they are set to have and i think we're going to hear from the state of the union, over these automatic spending cuts that are due to take effect. the president is saying, we cannot let this occur and he's ready to clearly have that fight with republicans on this. >> panetta leaving office with an extraordinary acknowledgement that the defense department, the cia, state department, all of them recommended to the president that the u.s. should start arming, directly arming syrian rebels but the president decided that was not necessarily a good idea. that's pretty extraordinary. >> it was extraordinary. he was asked about it at a congressional hearing. what is interesting to me is someone who covers washington, it's not that there is disagreement at certain points over policy between the secretary of defense
. the pentagon now cutting the amount of persian gulf aircraft carriers from two to one and delaying the fueling to save money. >> and others are ramping up spending and senior fellow at the advanced studies, lt. colonel tony schaeffer joins us now. >> how are you. >> alisyn: doing well. three weeks from now, march 1st, if congress doesn't get its act together there are sweeping military cuts set to go in place and this, at the same time that we know that china and russia, in the face of two decades will outpace us with their military spending. what do you make of that? >> well, firstoff, we spend 40% of the world's budget on defense right now and i think what we have to do is fix our strategy first. one of the problems is, ali, we have had the same basic frame work since 1947 and 1947 with some adjustments in the 80's, we figure out the real threats. i always talk about the beginning with the end in mind and this is where we have an opportunity here, since we won the cold war, we're ending the wars in afghanistan and iraq, time to rethink how we focus what we do. we've noticed spending money on
's not going to be any opportunity to cut pentagon spending in any serious way if you don't go over the cliff. so there is some stuff in there that i as a democrat don't like. but i think everybody's going to put something in the pot in order to balance the deficit. we did a lousy job in january on the tax side and i hope that -- i think it's better to go over the cliff than do a lousy job -- >> how many people do you know on your side of the field who actually agree with you? >> very few. look they're politicians. they want to spend as much money as they possibly can and they don't want to pay for it. >> who agrees with you? >> oh, i don't know. i bet -- oh, god, joe agrees with me. >> you forgot. the other thing, howard, and i'm just alluding to it, there will be no return to the bush era tax rates on anyone under $400,000? >> right. >> okay. so take that amount of money, whatever that is per year. how much do you need -- how many loopholes do you need to close? what is the marginal rate have to be on people above 400 to replace that potential revenue? it's 100%, isn't it? >> but i don't --
to oppose his nominees for top cabinet slots at the pentagon and cia. republican senator lindsey graham threatened to hold up those picks until the white house delivers more information about the attacks in benghazi. >> i don't think we should allow brennan to go forward for the cia directorship, hagel to be confirmed as secretary of defense until the white house gives us an accounting, did the president ever pick up the phone and call anyone in the libyan government to help these folks? what did the president do? yes, i'm going to ask my colleagues just like they did with john bolton, joe biden said, no confirmation without information. no confirmation without information. >> you are saying that you are going to block the nominations -- you're going to block them from coming to a vote until you get an answer? >> yes. >> now, john mccain has already think that he doesn't think republicans ought to filibuster this. what will you do? you're just going to put a hold on it? >> yeah, i'm not filibustering. this is a national security failure of monumental proportions, and i'm not going to st
in discretionary. we could actually clean all the waste out of the pentagon which is well over $100 billion a year. it still doesn't solve our problem. we cannot solve our problem unless we change medicare to save it and put a competitive model into our health care system that will allocate that scarce resource. it's really interesting. just yesterday the cms has finished going through all this bidding on durable medical equipment. and the statement coming from cms, for the first time, is hey, we just figured out competition works. about a 41% savings on durable medical equipment not just for the federal government but for the seniors who are going to be doing their co-pay. so competition works. and if it will work -- it works in this area, health care will work in the rest. we've just got to have a little pain. that happened to me as a child frequently with a popular switch. >> okay. well, there you go. >> there's a bumper sticker for 2014. >> chuck, good morning. senator, good morning. chuck, quick question for you. what are the odds you place on sequester going through and two, a government shu
and to the pentagon which this grant came from. we cannot abandon our soldiers who have served us well, and i would hope that the grant for this hospital will be continued because texas has been known to have the largest number of returning iraq and afghanistan troops. . that speaks loudly to the question of sequester, and i'm delighted to the president last evening could not have offered more olive branches on economic reform, tax reform, the idea that we can do this budget together. not a sequester, not a self-inflicted wound. it's what we did to ourselves. but more importantly to talk about innovation and growth. something that i have spoken about over and over again as a member formerly of the science committee and now homeland security. where is america's genius? right outside the beltway. why are we dividing ourselves along democrats and republicans refusing to put revenue alongside of cuts? mr. speaker, we are at the bone almost. and sequester that is across-the-board cuts will literally destroy us and put us in a recession. all the talking heads that are suggesting that the president was no
. now they're being told, not so fast. cnn pentagon correspondent barbara star is joining us. she's got details. what's going on, barbara? >> wolf, this is all about the budget politics in washington. it's been one of the major topics in the capitol, but out with the fleet, it is young military families that are already feeling the pain. for petty officer third class chastity peralta, washington budget politics has hit hard on the deck of the aircraft carrier "harry s. truman." >> i moved everything i own into storage and i signed over cust custdy of both of my children. >> this navy mother did that because the ship was supposed to leave last week for eight months in the middle east. the children were sent to live with their fathers. >> i cut off my cell phone bill, canceled everything i had, and moved on to the ship. >> reporter: but the navy suddenly changed course. the "truman" will stay put, saving millions of dollars during the budget crunch. it means one carrier, not two, in the middle east, leaving sailors left in port scrambling. >> i'm not going to take my children back and pul
, but also look at the ongoing waste, fraud and abuse over at the pentagon. i can't figure out how we can budget when the single largest discretionary item cannot be audited. we can get to know where the money and tax dollars are going and adequately set priorities. let me ask you about the cbo report on the american recovery and reinvestment not. i'd like to just ask you this, director. can you explain our targeted investment in the american people in our nation's critical infrastructure, high that created jobs and help to begin to grow the economy and also if we invested in a program to provide a coordinated benefits and social services that listed long-term economic stability and income, half of families in poverty, what impact would that be and what impact would that have in terms of our economic growth? >> congresswoman, as you know, we've estimate it consistently for the past four years that the recovery act taking effect at the time it did with economic circumstances the country phase increased output and jobs relative to what would've happened in the absence of the recovery act an
, fraud and abuse going on at the pentagon. i can't for the life of me figure out how we can budget when the single largest discretionary item on our budget cannot be audited. we need them to have an audit to know where our tax dollars are going and set priorities. let me ask you about the c.b.o. report on the american recovery and investment act. i would like to ask you, mr. director, can you explain how our government's targeted investment and the american people and in our nation's critical infrastructure, how that created jobs and how it helped to begin to grow the economy. and also if we invested in a program that provided coordinated benefits and social services that listed the long-term economic stability and incomes, say half the families living in poverty, what impact would that have overall in terms of our economic growth? >> as you know, we have estimated consistently for the past four years that the recovery act taking effect at the time it did with the economic circumstances that the country faced, increased output and jobs relative to what would have happened in the absence
is that the pentagon signed deals before the end of the year worth about $5 billion to make sure that the money was flowing before the sequester. >> $400 billion for this one weapon program. >> that's a lot of dough. >> that is a lot of dough. the cover is "the once and future pope." rick stengel, thanks for being with us. >>> coming up next, the first pictures of olympian and double amputee sprinter oscar pistorius after he's accused of shooting and killing his girlfriend. this is a guy who was the hero of london, sort of the field-good story last summer. now he is in jail accused of murder. we're going to have the latest straight ahead on "morning joe." [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. [ clears his throat ] by earning a degree from capella she'more iuniversity, isn't she? you'll have the
apart and obviously the optics of being out of town when there's steep cuts to the pentagon and other government programs is not great but it's really an oversimplification of the issue. >> molly, what about the plan put forth earlier this week, the $110 billion plan to avert the sequester. is that going to gain any traction? >> i doubt it. republicans have already basically said that's dead on arrival and as jake said it's not like they were getting anything done here in washington before they went on vacation. there really hasn't been any progress. there are no negotiations, nobody's talking to each other. you have these one-sided plans being put together and then they sort of get lobbed over the fence and the other side says eh, no. we're a long way from a constructive dialogue happening between the parties on capitol hill. >> jake in a piece yesterday you wrote "house republicans say if they spend the next two years like they spent the past two they'll become irrelevant." who are the most prominent republicans leading this charge toward as you put it irrelevancy? >> toward irrelev
hacked e hack in the pentagon a couple years. >> you have to figure the united states is doing that, as well. if you remember back in the last year, a book was revealing the that a virus that we developed that was responsible for essentially screwing up iran's nuclear program but they are after us. >> gretchen: brand-new video, 26-year-old cried and judge charged him with a premeditated murder of his model girlfriend. hundreds of miles away reeva steenkamp was laid to rest in an emotional ceremony. >> we're going to keep things close we remember about my sister and try to continue with the things that she tried to make a success. we'll misser. >> gretchen: meantime, oakley has suspended a contract with pistorius and nike says he has no plans of using him in future ad campaigns. >> drew peter so often will fight for a new trial. they already going to argue that the former lawyer did such a terrible job during thinks trial last year it led to a conviction. stenk will be next. he faces up to 60 years behind bars. >> engine room that crippled the carnival ship triumph and reveals that i
to their parents sang were having a canned fruit drive, we are in stock if the pentagon every nice thing to do. the kid takes the note home. the mom puts the old can't have something in a backpack that's been in the back of the cabinet for the. the kid comes to school with his huge backpack on his back getting scoliosis from it, dumps it into a barrel summer, has no idea why this happens. and we are not creating activism. we are creating pack meals. and still we need to transform our service activities so there's a relational peace. these kids are developing relationships with the people that they are serving. and they're learning to have -- that's just one small example. the trend 13 -- the i. is in transit -- i could go off on this one. i apologize already because i'm bout to take on tbi is because it's one of my pet peeves. tbi this is basically a behaviorist orientation that treats children like pat animals that rewards them with jimmy's and disempowers them. i've got principals and superintendents after telling me, calling me from all over saying it's killing my school. how can i fight a
the president for lost funding in federal programs and the pentagon over ten years, should the sequestration take place. house speaker john boehner said, quote, today the president advanced an argument republicans have been making for a year. his sequester is the wrong way to cut spending. senate majority leader mitch mcconnell insisted "more than three months after the november election, president obama still prefers campaign events to common sense, bipartisan action." and joining us now for more on this from washington, the former chief economist of the international monetary fund and bloomberg view columnist, simon johnson. he's the co-author of "white house burning: our national debt and why it matters to you," now out in paperback. simon, good to see you this morning. >> nice to be with you. >> simon, if you could help us through this over the next week or so, it doesn't look like there's a path to avoiding the sequestration if you listen to the two sides. so how damaging would this be? because we've heard a couple different versions of it that would have immediate impacts, more than 75
accept the criticism that the pentagon should have been warning about these sooner? >> first, we started the slowdown in spending on january 10. a number of the measures that i mentioned went into effect shortly after that. significant efforts were made to slow down spending on more draconian actions later. i know that people felt we should have said more earlier. 15 months ago the secretary sent a letter to the u.s. congress saying that the effects of sequestration would be devastating. after that we testified in august and again in september, we listed every single major item we're talking about. we said that there would be cutbacks in readiness and a unit buys would go down with unit costs growing up. what we did not do was detailed budget planning. i do not regret that. if we did it 60 months ago, we would have been wrong. we would not know that congress would have changed the size and the date and we would not have incurred the tigre -- we would not have incurred the degradation route. we sounded the alarm in every way that we could. >> what kind of contract are you having with the
.m. eastern a report on defense spending and modernizing the pentagon budget. the japanese prime minister is visiting washington. he will be talking about japan's future of 4:00 p.m. eastern of the center for strategic and international studies. >> its blockade is the principle no. n -- principal naval strategy of the northern states, the principal naval strategy of southern states is commerce. one gun right there, but if you are going after merchant ships, one is all you need. if you caught a merchant ship, the idea was to come alongside and accrue on board, take it to a court where it could be adjudicated, sell it at auction, and you get to keep the money, but because they depend entirely on the profit motive, the ship owner pays men, the ship hires the officers, he expects a return on your money. without friendly ports where they could be condemned and sold, you cannot make a profit on a private hearing. therefore, confederate private peering died out almost immediately. maritime entrepreneurs found out they could make more money blockade running. >> the his story and craig simon looks
vaccines -- without lifesaving vaccines and 90,000 pentagon employees will be furloughed. mr. president, it's easy to talk about furloughs unless you're one of those people being furl 0ed. we don't know how many days a week or month it will be, but it will be days. in nevada, 120 teachers would lose their jobs, local law enforcement agencies will lose essential funding to prosecute crime and thousands of defense department employees will be furloughed losing wages to support their families and our state's economy. residents of the republican leader's home state would also stuffer sufer. kentucky would lose funding that helps police catch and punish domestic abusers, and keeps at-risk children in shatt programs. more than 11,000 kentuckians will be furloughed. the nationwide sequester cuts would cost more than 750,000 jobs. more than 70,000 little boys and girls will be kicked out of the head start program. meat inspectors, air traffic controllers, f.b.i. officers and border patrol agents will be furloughed. small businesses which create two-thirds of all jobs in this country will lose acces
taking the civilian workers when our country is still at war at the pentagon and putting them on four days a week work is still waste. let those who think they've identified waste and no doubt there are efficiencies that can be found put their proposals forward and let those proposals be weighed in the context of a balanced approach. the question isn't whether we should leave any category immune. the question is whether we should have a balanced approach. and to assume, before anyone has laid out any kind of vision of how that $85 billion a year could be cut, that it must be possible and that everything else has to be ruled out seems to me to be a extraordinarily irresponsible approach. of course there are instances of waste in the federal government. there are also instances of huge unmet needs of diseases where we could find cures that save tens of thousands of people's lives in the next several years. but we're cutting the budget instead and denying ourselves the chances to find those cures. of infrastructure investments where we're risking more bridges collapsing and all we're doi
, you don't care. >> i guess, but i don't. i don't care. >>> the pentagon chief for the f-35 warplane is slamming his partner lockheed martin. he's accusing them of trying to squeeze every nickel out of the u.s. government faults them for seeing the long-term benefits of the project. >>> and tesla ceo eland musk vowing to pay back an energy deficit loan in half the time required by the government. the company receives a doe loan in 2010 and made the first payment of nearly $13 million in december. >> by the way, did you see yesterday -- remember we had -- there was a big debate about the test drive of the tesla in "the new york times." >> yeah. uh-huh. >> and phil lebeau -- >> went well. then edmonds did one yesterday. >> how did that go? >> not so well. the whole interior screen that sort of is the hub of the whole car, it stopped working. >> i don't understand this debate anyway. if you want to go a long trip like that, wouldn't you take a different car? rent a car or -- >> yeah. phil made the point. this is what you do -- >> andrew made the point, too. >> if you feel green and you
over 100,000 pentagon workers will be furloughed and an hour and a half line at least to get on a plane, more like four hours because they have to be furloughed. wait a second! i thought we were all going to all be affected. >> gretchen: that was monday, tuesday, wednesday. >> steve: right. it looks like the white house and cabinet minute secretaries have -- ministers clearly hyped this whole thing. keep in mind, the white house and the administration has a lot of leeway in how the cuts are administered among the agencies and phil gramm, former senator from texas who helped right the sequestration bill in the 1985s, he's going to be our guest in ten minutes. he's going to tell us about the president, if he makes the choices where they are deliberate, maximum cut for maximum political gain, that would be the wrong thing to do for america. >> gretchen: he seems to be backing off on that now because i think if this crisis ultimately did not happen come saturday, the credibility of the president and his administration would be called into question. meantime, what do you think about this? th
claim the pentagon shouldn't be cutting back on critical programs when the tv channel is producer workout programs. but dick durbin says that's missing the point and the forced budget cuts by law don't give departments much discretion can on where to cut. >> i can tell you, it's never that simple and they know it. when you start moving money this late in the game and with few options, your hands are tied. >> it's mandated by law that the attorney general and fbi director take government flights with secure for national security reason. they just want the government to manage its money more ee specific tifl. wolf? >> thanks very much for that report. >>> for 500 years, the swiss guard has kept the pope safe from harm. that job has changed a lot over the years. coming up, cnn talks to a former swiss guard that tells all about the time he spent at the vatican. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wou
during the testimony, it was interesting because panetta said the pentagon, the c.i.a., and the department of state were all on board with sending the rebels in syria where there has been mass genocide because of assad, for us to send them arms. you know who said no? the white house. well, we don't know if it's going to work. we don't know which of the rebels to arm. ultimately we don't know if it will result in the ouster of assad. >> brian: the "washington post" lead editorial today says hillary clinton and david petraeus, running the c.i.a. identified the group that they believe would have been the preferrable group to take over through all the rebels, they weeded through and had a plan. and the president nixed it. the word is too political. they wanted to make it seem we're not on a war footing with the election a month away. >> gretchen: maybe the election playing a huge role. let's look at the fox news polls right now. recently conducted, how many people feel our country compared to five years ago? nearly half of those polled say america is weaker and less po
introduced legislation calling for just that he claims since the pentagon is allowing women to serve they should be included in the draft. rangel wants no exemption for students enrolled in college. facebook the latest high profile company to be hackers. clicked on a web site that was compromised and it installed mall ware on their computers. the company says there is no evidence that any customer data was exposed. alisyn, tucker? >> thank you, clayton. when pope benedict made his shocking announcement this week that he would be stepping down. first time in almost 600 years that a pope retired from what is always a lifelong position. >> but there are plenty of professionals who also have lifelong careers so if you are one of them. how do you know if you should call it quits? here with the answers is fox business network's nicole petallides. >> or maybe good ideas. i don't know if i have the answers. this is a tricky topic. >> how do you know when it's a good time to retire? >> we have two ideas. the list of yes and when you should retire and when you really should step back. let's st
essential. i'm proud of the partnerships the state department has formed with the pentagon. america's traditional allies and friends in europe and east asia remain in valuable partners in nearly everything we do. we've spent energy strengthening those bonds over the past four years. the un and world bank and nato are still essentials. all of our institutions and relationships check need to be modernized and complemented by new institutions and partnerships that are tailored for new challenges and model to the needs of a variable landscape. like how we elevated the g-20 during the financial crisis or created the climate and clean air coalition to fight short live pollutants like black carbon. or work with parties where we stood up the first global terrorism forum. we are working with organizations. consider the arab league in libya. even the lower mekong initiative that we created to help reintegrate burma into its neighborhood and try to work across national boundaries on whether dams should or should not be billult. ilt. world, people want to actually show up. a secretary state mig
. the pentagon has to make a contribution to the effort. we put everything on the table we can get from where we are to where we need to be. that is common sense. that is where the tectonic forces are tugging in opposite directions. we did have a group of tenants who are making an effort to do similar to what the gang of six was trying to do. we're back to continue that. what i think we can do is work at a lower level whereby passing legislation, it might be the redistricting commission that you talked about. or maybe energy efficiency. to find some issue where it will be news that there is 20 verizon 20 republicans who are working together. m. e. they were sure bet each other's consent conference and advocates together for taking a step forward. it is by example and getting some small successes that we can change the way congress and functioning. -- congress is functioning. >> there was a group, i was part of. at the height of it there was 140 members, bipartisan, bicameral. we met several times and we were making a headway, putting a lot of ideas on the table. they've broken up when it decided
-- pentagon spending cuts set for march 1. later in the day, republican governor gary herbert will talk about his efforts to reform health care in his date and discuss utah's use of health insurance exchanges. he recently met with health secretary sibelius. live coverage at 12:30 p.m. eastern. >> according to pakistan's ambassador, drone strikes in pakistan are illegal and counterproductive. sherry rahman spoke to the christian science monitor on tuesday. here are part of her remarks. you can see the entire event on c-span.org. >> ambassador, i want to ask about drones. position is that they are a violation of your sovereignty and international law. under both of those categories, you have a right -- why don't you shoot down the drones? further, has pakistan threatens to shoot down drones. if not, why not? i ask this because there is an understanding that well pakistan publicly opposes strikes -- why don't you shoot down the drones? >> let me address this as most spokespeople to -- they speak to what they can. it is an important question. you asked a question which many ask. is there quiet co
washington post" that we needed to reduce dod as a reason to improve efficiency within the pentagon. that applies to all the other agencies as well. secondly, most of the concern about sequestration is about readiness. which is absolutely true. if you talk about the lawyers that work as defense contractors, they believe that they will have a field day. we have even had testimony last year that the legal household emanating from sequestration making up a lot of the savings. but beyond that, as senator ayotte and senator lindsey reference, there are a lot of dangerous places in the world. but we do is try to develop capabilities to deal with the unknowable contingencies of what could happen at a place like syria or iran or north korea. with less money, you can perform with fewer contingencies. this hurts us in the real world today. my final point is there are lots of options to deal with this. as was mentioned, the house passed bills twice last year to substitute sequestration savings for other more or other more targeted savings, so the same amount of money, and these domestic progra
. >>> the pentagon is cutting back the number of aircraft carriers in and around the persian gulf from two to one because of budget cuts. the move is expected to save several hundred million dollars. there have been two carriers in the region, though, for the last two years. >>> researchers say there's a new strain of whooping cough out there that may be resistant to the vaccine used for decades. last year was the worst year for whooping cough in the u.s. in more than 50 years. health officials think this new strain may be the reason why. the new germ was first found in france, japan and finland. now it's been found here in the u.s. . and one day after the u.s. postal service announced the end of saturday home mail delivery, in belgium the postal service there is adding something, chocolate flavored stamps. they are especially made to taste and smell like chocolate, definitely worth a second lick. no calories either, i don't think. a massachusetts man hoping his 14-year-old daughter will spend more time hitting the textbooks by staying away from facebook. he drew up a contract and agreed to pay h
, there is concern of layoffs. the dimensions darpa -- you d darpa. the except the restraints on the pentagon plus those coming into play, that have negative impacts? >> we are not a big player in that space anymore. i think a little bit of catalyst is something you see in every corner of the world. whether it is europe or china or anyplace else, i did not go to one place where there is no one government at all. the private sector is still very strong here and innovative. the private sector can pick up a lot. just getting it done. the will be such a value in a just getting some of these things behind us so we can adjust to move forward. the sigh of relief is incredibly important right now. i am an optimist. it does not end with a discussion on washington. we can compete. the work force of the to this country is as good as any in the world. >> thank you for the optimistic note. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] moste church is boston's visited historic site. half a million come to the church every year because
is a sequester that goes into effect cutting $85 billion this year. the pentagon notifies congress today of its large-scale furlough plan should those cuts kick in. >>> let's head to wall street. cnbc's jackie deangelis is at the new york stock exchange. good morning. >> good morning, natalie. another day, another cyber attack. this time on apple. authorities believe that the hackers that targeted facebook last week used the same software to attack the mac computers of apple employees. all this, of course, coming on the heels of chrysler, jeep and burger king saying their twitter accounts were hacked. >>> meanwhile it isn't 1999 but investors are sure partying like it is, after nasdaq hit an all-time high. google its stock price topping $800 a share yesterday. natalie? >> all right. jackie at the new york stock exchange, thank you. >>> the vice president is generating some buzz after a facebook town hall chat with parents' magazine and a discussion focusing on joe biden's gun control efforts. he gave frank advice on self-defense. >> if you want to protect yourself, get a double barrel shotgun.
until today to make these announcements. do you accept the criticism that the pentagon should have been we listed every major item we are talking about. we said we had to do furloughs. we said there would be cutbacks in readiness. we said unit costs would go up. all the same things. what we didn't do with a detailed budget planning and i don't regret that. we wouldn't have known the effects of the continuing resolution. we wouldn't have known that congress is going to change the size and the. moreover, we would have incurred the productivity and we would v done it six months ago, so i don't regret not doing that. i think we did sound the alarm in every way we could. >> i am wondering what kind of contract you are having with the white house and with congress there is going to have to be some. so are you trying to offer any solutions? also, i am wondering, what other things would you be doing right now if you were not spending all your time on this sequester. >> spending time with my wife -- i think i am hot the right person to answer. we are responsible for providing the nation's securi
's now responsible for sustainability. these reports are just coming from an office. deep in the pentagon or department of homeland security. these are deputy secretaries or assistant secretary at minimum level. as a result you get senior interested in these. the interesting day is the first set of these is a lot of exploring a better understanding of challenges within the big enterprise we have an beginning to put together strategies in the path we are headed. we are beginning to make great progress towards these goals. we're implementing strategy and dining areas that need to be addressed. the sustainability plans today look a little bit different than three years ago. if you're interested in finding them, there are performance stack of available for the public. >> is what way do they look different? >> they now are -- were not implementing strategies. if you look back, and they may have been trying things early on and now you're finding what works were also fighting we can take the strategies themselves and look at the department of transportation is doing really well in greenhouse gas
is of course an area heavh with pentagon contracts and military construction and the navy shipyard. what are you looking for? >> guest: the most interesting thing will be the votes in the e senate.d senate. i think it somehow democrats arf able to get the compromise bill, through that would offset the equation and would be very muchd thatpected. but that's maybe our one chance for the sequestered at this point. more likely it will be a vote where democrats put a plan forward and can garner enough support on the republican plan forward and also doesn't pass for the democratically controlled senate. and then you will see a lot ofph finger-pointing for roadsides with republicans saying the democrats couldn't pass the plad lannedsed one of the h nouse oft representatives and the democrats saying republicans are our cpromis blocked our compromise plan in the senate. so it's going to be a lot of there'-pointing and it will be very interesting to see if one oide or the other is able to garner a political the advantage. >> host: justin sink following the hill newspaper both on the hill and onlin
. the president following -- traveling to newport, virginia, an area happy with pentagon contracts, military construction, and the navy shipyard. what are you looking for? guest: the most interesting thing will be debates in the senate. if democrats are able to win over enough republicans to get a compromise deal through, that will really upset the equation. it would be very much unexpected. but that is maybe our one chance to offer the sequester at this point. more likely, it will be a vote where democrats put a plan forward, it cannot garner enough republican support, and it fails. a republican plan is put forward and also does not pass. the democrats control the senate. then, republicans will say the democrats could not pass a plan. the democrats will say, republicans have one to do what? they blocked a compromise plan in the senate. there will be a lot of finger- pointing, a lot of gamesmanship. it will be interesting to see if one side or the other is able to garner a political advantage. host: justin sink, who is following this story for "the hill" newspaper. >> here is a look at our
. just in time for spring, national parks like yosemite will see their services cut, the pentagon planning to force more than 700,000 defense department workers to take one day off a week, a 20% pay cut. near quantico marine base in northern virginia, the anticipation is already breeding anxiety. >> people are hunkered down, really afraid to spend any kind of money. >> reporter: there is bipartisan agreement for one thing, both sides seem to agree that these cuts will go into affect at the end of this week. there's also at least some good news. most of the layoffs and furloughs won't actually take place until a month from now. >> maybe they will sort it out at some point. peter alexander at the white house, thank you very much. >>> let's get a check of the top stories of the morning. natalie is here with those. >> good morning to you. >> good morning. welcome back. >> thank you. >> good morning, savannah. in the news this morning, john kerry is in london this morning as he kicks off his first official overseas trip as secretary of state. nbc's foreign chief correspondent andrea mi
those automatic spending cuts. >>> today chuck hagel is taking over at the pentagon after the senate voted 58-41 tuesday to confirm him as defense secretary. he was sworn in this morning. among his big challenges, those looming defense department budget cuts and troop levels in afghanistan. >>> last night in south africa, a private memorial service for model reeva steenkamp. the service planned by olympic runner oscar pistorius who says he shot her by accident on valentine's day. pistorius is charged with premeditated murder. >>> a new honor today for the late civil rights pioneer rosa parks. the unveiling of a statue of her on capitol hill with president obama and congressional leaders taking part. known as the mother of the civil rights movement, rosa parks refused to give up her seat to a white man on a montgomery, alabama, city bus back in 1955. this month marks what would have been her 100th birthday. >>> and nicolas cage was the big winner on a recent high school game show in boston when the host chatted with contestants about movies they like. one team was four for four for ni
on that "washington post" article that came out recently. it did suggest that the pentagon is pushing a plan that we keep on about 8000 troops in afghanistan. i know that general austin, you weren't a part of the planning process thus far, but can you supported plan that would scheduled withdrawal of troops in advance? you know, we are looking at withdrawal of troops in afghanistan, and according to this article from about 8000 down to 1000 within a very short period of time. i have questions if we can even maintain our mission, let alone complete the mission. how can you make decisions on troop withdrawal when, as you stated previously, so much depends upon conditions on the ground, what the government is doing, what their abilities are up to that point. how would you approach a proposal like that? >> i certainly would first really work hard to make sure i fully understood what the leadership wanted to get done moving into the future. and i certainly, my advice as a commander on the ground or commander of central command, i would provide my advice based upon where i think the security forces are, a
the enemy didn't have. but the second two points i think at that first of all the pentagon didn't show you any video of things it missed. that's bad pr. and the percentage of weapons that were smart weapons in the first gulf war while infinitely anything more than the iraqis had was remarkably small. compared to the impression the pentagon gave in the military briefings where they only showed pictures of smart bombs and smart missiles seen flying through windows. that was a very, very tiny percentage of the munitions actually expend. so i don't think this is so much a revolution of military affairs so much as a vivid demonstration as you pointed out as just a proficient at united states was in waging war, especially against a less proficient adversary. but it also was a military affairs, and that is the ultimate goal of the conflict was a political goal. and so, therefore, the military planning that involve both smart and dumb weapons in a war where design with a traditional military conclusion, which in truth was not revolution at all which was getting the enemy to do what you wanted. so
Search Results 1,850 to 1,899 of about 1,902 (some duplicates have been removed)